05
Mar
2019

Choosing the Best Flooring Materials

There are so many types of flooring materials that it can really be a challenge to choose. Pine Harbor Log Homes hopes to simplify the process for our customers by suggesting some of the best options, but ultimately you get to choose what will work best for you and your new home and budget.

Here are the factors that we consider to be the most important.

Is Your Climate Cold?

Traditionally, homebuilders in climates where there is a cold winter will choose materials that are insulating and not cold to the touch. Most often the choice today is hardwood of some variety simply because wood flooring does not feel nearly as cold to bare feet. Bamboo or cork are also “warm” options.

You may remember that wall-to-wall carpeting was popular for several decades, probably for just this reason. But the trend now is for cleaner, hard surfaces that don’t accumulate dirt and require much vacuuming. Area rugs or mats can add warmth to wood flooring as well as color and texture.


Is Your Climate Hot?

One of the secrets to living in hot climates is to use ceramic tiles, stone tiles or other more exotic materials like stained concrete that feel cool to the touch. Bare feet on ceramic tiles feel great when it is sweltering and horrible when it is freezing. So, your choice of flooring should be greatly influenced by the local climate.


Does Your Climate Change Seasonally?

If your climate is not extreme, but it changes seasonally, there are plenty of options that work all-year-round. In addition to hardwood, you have various vinyl flooring options; some that look deceptively like various types of wood flooring or stone tiles. You also have very attractive bamboo and other laminate options. Area rugs can also add warmth when and where needed to put a barrier between you and a cold floor during the winter.


Is the Area Wet or Dirty?

Tile or vinyl flooring has always been popular in areas that are likely to get wet or dirty and require frequent washing: kitchens, bathrooms, laundry areas, entryways. While there are no rules against using hardwood flooring in a kitchen for example, you might prefer a more wet-tolerant vinyl flooring that just fools the eye into believing that it is wood.


Whether we are building your log home in Wisconsin or Florida, Arizona or Minnesota or anywhere in between, we can help you find the perfect flooring match for your climate and lifestyle.

(844) 800-6852